baby steps

Today’s quick post is an example of an incremental improvement to an existing graph that makes it easier for the audience to read. When practicing being a better communicator with data at work, it’s easy to become consumed by the desire for perfection and talk ourselves into thinking it’s an all-or-nothing approach. Rather, the opposite is true: incremental improvements are achievable baby steps we can take to become better data communicators. 

Consider the following visual and imagine it’s part of a semi-annual update to senior leadership. The data displayed is total dollar volume of an organization’s funding amongst its various initiatives. Within each initiative, the stacked bars break down the dollar volume into three stages: distributed, pending and funded.

 
Picture1.png
 

Assume a stakeholder asks you for an updated version by the end of the day. Given the tight deadline you don’t have time to make big sweeping changes—however, you can use this as an opportunity to make an incremental and impactful improvement. Study the visual and ask yourself: what is one change that would make this graph easier to read?

Do you have your change in mind? Read on to see what mine is!

My incremental improvement is to reposition the words to the top. More specifically, I’d choose to left-align the chart title and supporting subtext while moving the legend and x-axis labels to the top of the graph. The benefit is that my audience sees how to read the graph before they get to the data! You can see this change reflected below.

 
 

There are certainly more modifications I’d make given ample opportunity but time constraints are real. Continually evaluating our graphs for readability and implementing small incremental changes sets us up for improved future iterations and, ultimately, success. You can download the Excel file to see how I made these changes. 

What was the incremental change you’d make given limited time? Leave a comment with your thoughts! Now, consider your own work: what baby step could you apply to make an existing graph easier to read?

how to do it in Excel: a shaded range

Today's post is a tactical Excel how-to: adding a shaded region to depict a range of values. 

To illustrate, let’s consider an example from the tourism industry. Suppose a watersports company offers four categories of outings: fishing charters, family rentals, nature cruises and sunset cruises. The graph below shows the monthly volume of passengers for each offering over a year.

 
 

We can see there’s clear seasonality in this business—overall volume is highest in the summer and each outing type generally follows the same monthly pattern. Let’s say you manage the Family rentals and you’d like to compare your monthly volume to what you’re seeing across the entire fleet. 

For the purpose of this tactical illustration, let’s assume the shape of the data—relative peaks and valleys—is more important than the specifics of each category individually. If that’s the case, I can simplify by showing a shaded region to depict the range of absolute passengers each month.

My resulting graph looks like this:

 
Picture23.PNG
 

Creating this shaded region in Excel requires some brute-force formatting utilizing area charts. Here’s a step-by-step overview of how I accomplished this—you can download the file to follow along.

In my Excel spreadsheet, the data graphed above looks like this:

 
Picture3.png
 

The first thing I’ll do is add two new columns calculating the minimum and maximum values for each month. I used a =MIN() and =MAX() function and my resulting series looks like this:

 
Picture4.png
 

To create the shaded region, first I added the Min and Max as new data series and deleted the lines depicting fishing, sunset and nature. Then I adjusted the formatting of Min and Max to create the grey band around family rentals. The following steps show how I accomplished this:

Next, delete the series for fishing, nature and sunset cruises (leaving only family rentals displayed) by highlighting each individual line and pressing delete

 
Picture2.PNG
 

Add a new data series for the Maximum by right-clicking the chart and choosing Select Data:

 
 

In the Select Data Source dialog box, click the + button to add a new data series for the Maximum (my Max series is in cells P6:P17 with Name in P5). Click OK when done. 

 
Picture7.png
 

My resulting chart looks like this:

 
Picture8.PNG
 

Reformat the the Max line by changing it to a 2D stacked area: right click the “Max” line, go to “Choose Chart Type” then select “Line”. Scroll down to the 2D area types and select the 2D stacked area chart (It’s the middle one for my version of Excel):

 
Picture9.png
 

My resulting graph looks like this:

 
 

Change the Max 2D stacked area to grey fill by right-clicking the series, choosing Format Data Series

 
 

In the Format Data Series dialog box, select Fill and choose the Solid fill option. My selected grey is RGB 191-183-185. 

 
Picture12.png
 

My resulting chart looks like this (note: my Max stacked area chart is set to display as Series 2 although we’ll adjust this in a later step):

 
 

Add a new data series for the Minimum by right-clicking the chart and choosing “Select Data”:

 
Picture14.PNG
 

In the Select Data Source dialog box, click the + button to add a new data series for the Minimum (my Min series is in cells O6:O17 with Name in O5). Click OK when done. 

 
Picture15.png
 

My resulting chart looks like this:

 
Picture15.PNG
 

Reformat the Min line by changing it to an area: right click the “Min” line, go to “Choose Chart Type” then select “Line”. Scroll down to the 2D area types and this time, we’ll select the 2D area chart (mine is the first one in my version of Excel):

 
 

My resulting graph looks like this:

 
Picture17.PNG
 

Reformat the Min 2D area to grey fill by right-clicking the series, choosing Format Data Series: 

 
Picture19.PNG
 

In the Format Data Series box, change to Solid fill with Color = White. Under Border, select No line

 
 

The result is this:

 
Picture18.PNG
 

For final formatting changes, I added text boxes for the Max and Min labels and changed Family rentals to render in black for sufficient contrast against the grey band. Depending on where your Max series is displayed, you may also need to ensure that the white Min series is displayed on top if it is not rendering. Highlight the Max series and in the formula bar, ensure the last option is 2. You can also adjust the display order in the “Select Data Series” dialog box. 

 
 

Voila! A shaded region to emphasize a range around my data point of interest:

 
 

Are there other brute-force Excel methods you’re aware of for achieving this effect? Or other considerations with embedding this shaded region? Leave a comment with your thoughts and stay tuned for a new resource coming soon where you can practice and share similar tips!    


Elizabeth Ricks is a Data Visualization Designer on the Storytelling with Data team. She has a passion for helping her audience understand the ’so-what?’ as concisely as possible. Connect with Elizabeth on LinkedIn or Twitter.

tactical tip: embedding a vertical reference line in Excel

Today's post is a step-by-step Excel “how-to” inspired by a reader question we received following a recent post on using dotted lines in data visualizations.

Dave asked:
“Do you know of a trick for drawing vertical lines to delineate years (or actuals/historical vs forecast/future segments of the chart)? I currently have to draw them with the line drawing tool, which gets messy when moving the chart on a PPT slide. If there were a way to embed it in the data or somehow format the chart, that'd be awesome.”

The following chart illustrates what Dave describes. The data is units of output over time where the first nine months of the series are actual data and the remaining four months of the year are a forecast. The dotted line serves as a visual cue to differentiate actual from forecast. Created in Excel, the line was physically drawn on the graph with the Shape Illustrator. While this approach might suffice as a quick method for achieving the desired effect; it isn’t ideal for recurring use of the graph, particularly if the line’s position on the x-axis might change in future iterations.

 
Picture1.png
 

After some research and playing around in Excel, I’ve devised one method for achieving this effect, which I’ll outline in this post (I’m sure there are others!). Don't be dismayed by the number of steps: it's a one-time setup after which can be easily refreshed in future iterations by changing where you want the reference line. I’m using Excel 2016 and you can download the accompanying file.

In my spreadsheet, the data for the Output over time chart looks like this:

 
Picture2.png
 

1. Go to a blank cell range and enter these values as shown in my screenshot below. I’m choosing to add these new values directly underneath my data range in cells F19:G21. This will eventually become the coordinates for a secondary scatterplot that we’ll add in a later step.

 
Picture3.png
 

2. Choose where you want the vertical reference line to cross the x-axis and enter those values below “X”. In this example, I want the line located on the September data point, the ninth point in my data series. In cells G20:G21, I entered “9” in each, as shown below. (Note: for a more automated approach in a larger dataset, a MATCH formula could also calculate where September falls in the range: =MATCH("Sep",$F$7:$F$18,0).

 
Picture4.png
 

3. Add a new data series by right-clicking the graph and choosing Select Data:

 
 

4.  In Select Data Source dialog, click the Add button.

 
 

5. In the Edit Series dialog, enter a name for your data series (I chose “reference”) and select the X values you entered from Step 2. I selected the 9’s in G20:G21. Click OK to exit the dialog boxes.

 
 

The resulting visual looks like this:

 
 

6. Right click the new line and choose Change Series Chart Type.

 
 

7. In the Change Chart Type dialog box, select Combo section under All Charts tab. Then select Scatter with Straight Lines and check the option for Secondary Axis. Click OK to exit.

 
Picture10.png
 

The resulting visual looks like this:

 
 

8. Go to the chart, right click the red reference line and choose Select Data again. In the Select Data Source dialog, highlight reference and click Edit.

 
 

9. In Edit Series dialog, update the X values to be the original values you selected in Step 5. Set the Y values to be 0,1. Click OK to exit.

 
Picture13.png
 

The resulting visual looks like this:

 
 

The remaining steps are visual cleanup: first, I forced the red line to align with the top of the primary y-axis and second, I hid the secondary axis line and text labels.   

10. Right-click on the secondary y-axis and select Format Axis:

 
Picture15.png
 

11. In the Axis options section, type 1 into the textbox beside the Maximum option.

 
 

12. In the Text Options section, under Text Fill, choose No fill. This will remove the text labels on the secondary y-axis.

 
 

13. In the Axis Options section, under Line, choose No line. This will remove the secondary y-axis line.

 
 

Voila! The resulting visual has an embedded vertical line, which is plotted on a hidden secondary y-axis.

 
Picture20.png
 

Recall that this goal of this specific scenario was a dotted line which visually differentiated the actual and forecast sections. My last step was to change the formatting of the line to appear as a thin, grey dashed line.  

(Note: To achieve your preferred formatting, right-click the line and select Format Data Series in the context menu where you’ll find formatting selections in the resulting dialog pane.)

 
 

This method does come with some trade-offs to consider.

One downside is that you lose some control over the exact placement of the line where it crosses the x-axis. Below you’ll see a comparison between the manual vs embedded approach. With the manual approach, the line can be drawn exactly on the tick mark between the Aug & Sep data points, providing a clean alignment with the x-axis. With the embedded approach, the line is centered above the Sep label, resulting in a slightly less seamless effect.

 
 

On the cosmetic side, another downside is losing the flexibility to manipulate the length of the line for labeling purposes. I’ll illustrate this with a horizontal bar chart (which I also created using this method). With the manual approach, I can physically draw the line to extend above the x-axis line, aligning it closely to the “Target” text label. With the embedded approach, the line stays below the x-axis line, creating a gap between the line and the label that describes it.

 
 

You can download the Excel file to see the behind-the-scenes of these graphs. Are there other methods you’re aware of for achieving this effect? Or other considerations with embedding the reference line directly? Leave a comment with your thoughts!


Elizabeth Ricks is a Data Visualization Designer on the Storytelling with Data team. She has a passion for helping her audience understand the ’so-what?’ as concisely as possible. Connect with Elizabeth on LinkedIn or Twitter.

visualizing uncertainty

We often have some measure of uncertainty in our data—a forecast, prediction or range of possible values. A common challenge is how to visualize that uncertainty and help our audience understand the implications. In today’s post, I’ll use a real-world example to illustrate one approach and share tactics for creating in Excel.

The client’s original visual looked similar to the one below. It shows 2017 earnings per share (EPS) and the forecast outlook for the next four years. The client used a CAGR to forecast a range of possible EPS values from 2018 - 2021.  

 
Picture1.png
 

At first glance, it wasn’t obvious that the blue bars represented a forecast (even with the x-axis labeling of “E” for expected). The first yellow bar represents the 2017 actual EPS and next four blue bars are the forecast for 2018 - 2021 where the solid section represents the midpoint and the data labels is the uncertain piece—the range of projected values.  

I made a few design changes to make the graph a little easier to interpret. I first changed the bars to lines and used a dotted line for 2018 - 2021 with unfilled data markers to help visually reinforce the uncertainty.

 
Picture4.png
 

In Excel, there are two potential ways to achieve this formatting. A brute-force approach is to use a single data series and format each individual data point as a dotted line. Another approach is to graph two separate data series, one as a solid point or line and the second as a dashed line or unfilled circle, with a point of overlap to make the lines connect. You can read more detail about these two approaches in this prior post.

We often face the decision of preserving the y-axis vs. labeling data directly. I’ve done the latter in the visual below. One consideration in this decision point is the level of specificity your audience needs: are the actual values important? Or is the overall shape of the data more important? You can read more about these considerations in this prior post.

 
 

Next, let’s revisit how to show the range of forecast values. The original visual is shown again below where the forecast EPS values are represented by the data labels on top of the bars.

 
 

Rather than leave the audience with the highly taxing processing of reading these values, we can aid interpretation by instead depicting the forecast as a shaded range around the point estimate. This keeps the emphasis on the midpoints, while reducing clutter and eliminating the additional work the audience has to do. If the specific forecast values are important to the audience, we’ll deal with that momentarily.

 
 

The brute-force Excel method to adding this grey band requires a little math, graphing a second data series as a stacked bar and then formatting the stacked bar so that the bottom section renders white and the top section grey. You can download the accompanying Excel file to see how I accomplished this.

 
Picture6.png
 

But the visual is not yet complete. We should take the opportunity to add value to this data by telling the intended audience what they should know. Let’s assume this is a positive story where the outlook from the original base year (2016) has been extended to 2018. I might add explanatory text, paired with strategic use of color (I chose green to depict positivity) to focus attention on the relevant points of the data. If specific forecast EPS values are important for a given year, I could include them for context in the text. For a very technical audience, I might include even more detail with the statistics around the forecast. Just a reminder to always design with the audience’s needs in mind!

 
Picture5.png
 

 

Are you aware of other methods to achieve this effect? Have you seen other examples of uncertainty depicted effectively or tips you’d like to share? Leave a comment with your thoughts!


Elizabeth Ricks is a Data Visualization Designer on the Storytelling with Data team. She has a passion for helping her audience understand the ’so-what?’ as concisely as possible. Connect with Elizabeth on LinkedIn or Twitter.

when to use a dotted line

When visualizing and communicating with data, one design element we can play with is line style. Most tools default to and we most often use and see solid lines. But a dotted line is another possibility. What considerations should we think about with a dotted line? When should we use one? In this post, I’ll outline my thoughts and illustrate the scenarios in which I find myself using dotted lines through examples plus will share some commentary on how to do this in your tools.

considerations with dotted lines

Dotted lines are super attention grabbing. They also convey a sense of uncertainty that can be useful. The challenge is that dotted lines introduce some visual noise. From a clutter standpoint, we’ve taken what could have been visualized as a single visual element (a line) and chopped it into a ton of pieces (many little lines, dashes, or dots). Because of this, I recommend against using the dotted line as a way to attract attention (rather use less noisy means of contrast, such as position, size, or color for this). Preserve the use of dotted lines for when there is a target or goal we are trying to hit or remain a certain side of or when there is uncertainty to depict (a forecast or prediction). In these cases, the visual differentiation and sense of uncertainty that the dotted line helps depict makes up for the additional visual noise it introduces. Let’s look at an example of each of these use cases and some dotted lines in action.

dotted line for a goal or target

I was recently working with a graph similar to the following that depicted time to fill a given type of role at a company:

Dotted Lines 1.png
 

There are three lines in the graph above: (1) the Goal—which you likely looked at first both due to position and because it’s bold black, which stands out more than the other colored lines, (2) average days to fill roles for Internal candidates (orange), and (3) average days to fill roles with External hires over time (teal). The Internal and External lines represent data that we’ve collected and summarized, whereas the Goal is something we have set and in this case we’d like to stay below. To set the Goal apart—and here I'm interested in making it less attention grabbing but still want it there for reference—we could use a dotted line. Dotted lines come in different styles, both in terms of the thickness of the line and how large or small the individual pieces are. We also have some other design elements at our disposal when it comes to the formatting of the line and the text that goes with it. Here’s an example of how I iterated to land on a combination I liked:

Dotted Lines 2.png

I prefer the final view, where the dotted line is thin and grey, effectively pushing it to the background (in spite of the noise that this line style introduces). I should probably mention that there are other styles of dotted lines as well (for example, some that combine dashes and dots)—I recommend avoiding these because they look quite messy and instead choose a style where the segments (whether dashes or dots) are consistently spaced. Here is what my final iteration looks like in the full graph:

Dotted Lines 3.png
 

I like this. The GOAL is clearly stated and still the first thing I see, but due to the formatting it feels more like reference or context, while the thicker solid lines are the clear focus of the graph. Also—and perhaps it's just me, but—there's something about this view that makes it feel easier to compare each of the individual lines (Internal and External) to the GOAL than in the original view when all of the lines were of similar thickness.

dotted line to depict uncertainty

I often see graphs where some data is actual and some is forecast and there isn’t anything done to differentiate the two, like the following example.

 

Given that we are standing in 2018, some of the data in the graph above clearly hasn’t happened yet and so must be forecast. But how much? Was this graph recently made using actual data through 2017 and forecasting thereafter? Perhaps, but we’d have to make that assumption, because nothing in the graph tells us. Or maybe there was a footnote hiding down at the bottom of the original that articulated this (there wasn't, but in case there were); I shouldn't have to read the fine print in order to know how to read the graph. Don’t make your audience question, make assumptions, or hunt for detail like this—make it clear.

One option is to use words to differentiate between actual and forecast. In the following, I added supercategories along the bottom to indicate which dates are associated with actual data and which are forecast (check out the recent post illustrating the step-by-step on how to achieve in Excel if that’s of interest). Since we're on the topic of dotted lines, I could also add a dotted line to further visually differentiate actual vs. forecast data:

Dotted Lines 5.png
 

Even better, though, if I preserve my use of the dotted line to depict the uncertainty directly for the portion of the line that represents forecast data. If I do this, I don’t need to add the additional line at all. Here’s what it could look like:

Dotted Lines 6.png

In this case, both the line style and the words on the x-axis make it quickly clear which data points represent actual data and which are forecast. I'm a big advocate of thick, bold, solid lines and data markers for actual data and thin, dotted lines (and sometimes non-filled in data markers, though I felt that looked too messy here) for forecasts and predicted data because of the way it helps us intuitively understand what we are looking at when executed well.

In the above, I’m assuming the forecast data points are important enough to label directly (in other words, that the specific numeric values are important; if that weren’t the case, you might approach this differently, perhaps only labeling the 2017 and 2022 points, or not labeling any of them and rather letting the y-axis for general magnitude be good enough). I can imagining different people making different choices here depending on both what you want the audience to focus on as well as personal aesthetic preferences. The meta-point: be thoughtful when it comes to design details in general, and your use of dotted lines in particular.

the tactical: how do I do this in my tool?

Changing the formatting of a single line from solid to dotted—like in the first example above—is possible and pretty straightforward in most tools. This is typically achieved through a menu or code to change the line style. If you aren’t sure how to do this, some smart Google searching with the name of your tool and something like “change line in graph to dotted” should point you towards a solution.

Changing just part of a line from solid to dotted is slightly more complicated, but there are a couple of solutions for that. There is the brute-force method of physically formatting each individual data point (for example if you are working in Excel, you would click once to highlight the series, then click again to highlight an individual data point, and then can format that data point or associated line individually as you would like it). As you can imagine, this can be time-consuming. Another way is to make what will appear to be a single line actually two different data series, allowing you to format them separately. In the Sales example above, I’d have a column of dates that goes from 2010 to 2022 to set my x-axis. Then my first series for the ACTUAL data would have values from 2010 to 2017. I’d have a second series for my FORECAST line that has values from 2017 to 2022 (note the overlap with 2017 having values for both ACTUAL and FORECAST to avoid a gap in the line). I imagine you could use a similar approach in other tools.

You can download the Excel file with the above examples (including both the brute force and more elegant solutions described above for the second example).

These are the two use cases in which I find myself using dotted lines and promoting their use. Are there other cases where you’d recommend using a dotted line? Or additional considerations we should have in mind when choosing line style? Leave a comment with your thoughts!

how we position and what we compare

When visualizing data, one piece of advice I often give is to consider what you want your audience to be able to compare, and align those things to a common baseline and put them as close together as possible. This makes the comparison easy. If we step back and consider this more generally, the way we organize our data has implications on what our audience can more (or less) easily do with the data and what they are able to easily (or not so easily) compare.

I was working with a client recently when this came into play. The task was to visualize funnel data for a number of cohorts. For each cohort, there were a number of funnel stages, or “gates,” where accounts could fall out: targeted, engaged, pitched, and adopted. Each of these stage represents some portion of those accounts that made it through the previous stage. In this case, the client wanted to compare all of this across a handful of cohorts and regions. Here is an anonymized version of the original graph:

 
Cohort Analysis 1.png
 

There are some things I like about this visual. Everything is titled and labeled. So, while it takes a bit of time to orient and figure out what I’m looking at, the words are all there so that I can eventually figure this out, helping to make the data accessible. But when I step back and think about what I can easily do with the current arrangement of the data, there are a number of limitations. Let’s consider the relative levels of work it takes to make various comparisons within this set of graphs.

The easiest comparison for me to make is looking at a given region within a given cohort and focusing on the relative stages of the funnel. For example, if we start at the top left, I can easily compare for the Q1 Cohort in North America the purple vs. blue vs. orange vs. green bar. This is because they are both (1) aligned to a common baseline and (2) close in proximity (directly next to each other).

The next most straightforward comparison I can make is for a given stage in the funnel, I can compare across the various regions for a given cohort. So again, starting at the top left, I can compare within the Q1 Cohort the first purple bar (Targeted in North America) scanning right to the next purple bar (Targeted in EMEA), and so on. They are still aligned to a common baseline, but in this case they aren’t right next to each other (I’m inclined to take my index finger and trace along to help with this comparison). This is a little harder than the first comparison described above, but still possible.

The next comparison I can make—and this one is quite a bit more difficult—is a step in the funnel for a given region across cohorts. Again, starting at the top left, I can take that initial purple bar (Targeted in North America) and now scan downwards to compare to that same point for the Q2 cohort and the Q3 cohort. This is harder, because these bars are not aligned to a common baseline and they are also not next to each other. I can see that the bottom leftmost purple bar is bigger than the ones above it. But if I need to have a sense of how much bigger, that’s hard for me to wrap my head around. The numbers are there via the y-axis to make it possible, but it means I'm having to remember numbers and perhaps do a bit of math as I scan across the bars, which is simply more work.

And if we step back and think about it… comparisons across cohorts… this is actually potentially one of the most important comparisons that we’d like to be able to make! Visualizing and arranging our data differently could make this easier.

Perhaps it’s just me (and this really could be the case), but when I think of cohort analysis, it actually reminds me of my days in banking (a former life) and decay curves, and when I think of “curves,” it makes me think of lines, which makes me want to draw some lines over these bars… Actually, let’s try that. Here’s what it looks like if I draw lines over the bars in the first graph (Q1 cohort):

 
Cohort Analysis 2_short.png
 

While I’m at it, I might as well draw lines across the other graphs, too:

 
Cohort Analysis 3.png
 

And now that we have the lines, we don’t need the bars…

 
Cohort Analysis 4.png
 

The bars would have likely been too much to put into a single graph. But now that I’ve replaced what was previously four bars with a single line—thus remaking my original 16 bars in each graph into 4 lines, or if we multiply that across the three graphs, I’ve turned 48 bars into 12 lines—those, I can potentially all put into a single graph. It would look like this:

 
Cohort Analysis 5.png
 

While it’s nice to have everything in a single graph, those lines on their own don’t make much sense. Next, I’ll add the requisite details: axis labels and titles so we know what we’re looking at.

 
Cohort Analysis 6.png
 

Note that I didn’t have space to write out “Targeted,” “Engaged,” “Pitched,” and “Adopted” for every single data point. Instead, I chose to use just the first letter of each of these along the x-axis, and then I have a legend of sorts below the region that lists out what each of these letters means. This may not be a perfect solution, but every decision when we visualize data involves tradeoffs, and I’ve decided I’m ok with the tradeoffs here.

You’ll perhaps notice here that I haven’t labeled the various cohorts yet. With this view, I could focus on one at a time (calling out either via text or my spoken narrative if talking through this live to make it clear what we are focusing on). For example, maybe first I want to set the stage and focus on the Q1 cohort and how it looked across the various funnel stages and regions:

 
Cohort Analysis 7.png
 

I could then do the same for the Q2 cohort (lower across everywhere: Is this expected? What drove this? My voiceover could lend commentary to raise or answer these questions):

 
Cohort Analysis 8.png
 

Then finally, I could do the same for the Q3 cohort (ah, now our metrics have recovered from their lows in the Q2 cohort and are now even higher than Q1, did we do something specific to achieve this? Looks like we targeted a higher proportion of the overall cohort, and it’s interesting to see how that impacted the downstream funnel stages):

 
Cohort Analysis 9.png
 

Note with this view, I could also focus on a given region at a time. For example, it might be interesting to note that these metrics are lower across all cohorts in North America compared to the other regions:

 
Cohort Analysis 10.png
 

Or the spread in APAC across cohorts might be noteworthy, as it’s the largest variance across cohorts compared to the other regions:

 
Cohort Analysis 11.png
 

This piece-by-piece emphasis could work well in a live presentation. But in the case where this is for a report or presentation that will be sent out where we’d likely have a single version of the graph (vs. the multiple iterations that can work well in a live setting so you can focus your audience on what you’re talking about as you discuss the various details), I’d venture to guess that the most recent cohort (Q3) is perhaps the most relevant, so let’s bring our focus back to that:

 
Cohort Analysis 12.png
 

Within the Q3 cohort, we may consider emphasizing one or a couple of data points. Data markers and labels are one way to draw attention and signal importance. If I put them everywhere, we’ll quickly end up with a cluttered mess. But if I’m strategic about which I show, I can help guide my audience towards specific comparisons within the data. For example, if the ultimate success metric is what proportion of accounts have adopted whatever it is we’re tracking (I’ve anonymized that detail away here), I might emphasize just those data points for the most recent cohort:

 
Cohort Analysis 13.png
 

Given the spatial separation between regions, I don’t necessarily have to introduce color here. But if I want to include some text to lend additional context about what’s going on in each region and what’s driving it, I could introduce color into the graph and then use that same color schematic for my annotations, tying those together visually:

 
Cohort Analysis 14.png
 

Let’s take a quick look at the before-and-after:

Cohort Analysis 15.png

Any time you create a visual, take a step back and think about what you want to allow your audience to do with the data. What should they be able to most easily compare? The design choices you make—how you visualize and arrange the data—can make those comparisons easy or difficult. Aim to make it easy.

The Excel file with the above visuals can be downloaded here. I should perhaps mention a hack I used to achieve this overall layout: each cohort is a single line graph in Excel, where I’ve formatted it so there is no connecting line between the Adopted point for one region and the Targeted point in the following region. (It may be brute force, but it works!)